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Mindful Pregnancy

Ultrasound: The First Unnecessary & Unsafe Medical Intervention In Many Pregnancies

From Emma Lewis HEART BEATS OR HEART MESSAGES? For a full list of studies: Doppler Danger Links updated First published in The Mother magazine Issue 16 Winter 2005/2006 and subsequently also published on Joyous Birth (www.joyousbirth.info) and various birth and parenting newsletters in New Zealand, UK & Australia. Did you have a scan during your pregnancy? […] Continue reading →

Sacred Womb

“The strongest ‘pound for pound’ muscle is the uterus: it weighs around 2 pounds but during childbirth can exert a downward force of 400 Newtons, which is one hundred times as strong as gravity and equivalent to the power in a fully extended modern longbow” –The Book Of General Ignorance by John Mitchinson When not […] Continue reading →

Birth As An American Right of Passage

Fantastic work by Davis-Floyd for her extensive research and meticulous documentation of such an important topic!  She has done an amazing job analyzing the current state of hospital birthing rituals in America.  She leads the reader to the true messages and underlying values that the current medical establishment brings forth and serves to perpetuate.  As […] Continue reading →

Sacred Placenta: the Tree of Life

The placenta is the first organ to develop following the fertilization of the egg.  After fertilization, the egg divides into two cells. One will be the placenta and one will be the baby.  At twelve weeks it takes over the production of hormones.  The first hormone produced is hCG (human chorionic gonadotropi), which is the […] Continue reading →

What Happened to Birth?

When did birth become something that women looked towards fearfully? When did American women start to look outward for confirmation about their body and baby (doctors/midwives) instead of looking within and using their intuition and innate knowledge of their bodies? Why have we been taught to fear our bodies and not understand them as women? […] Continue reading →